Children's Stories

Read about kids rescued from child labor and other GoodWeave beneficiaries. Instead of spending long days for little or no pay working on weaving looms, they are attending school preparing for their futures.

Laughter and Forgetting: Binod
Watch Binod laughing and kicking a soccer ball around with his friends in the dusty yard at GoodWeave’s Hamro Ghar, and he is just another kid. You won’t notice the depth of sadness in his eyes. He works hard to hide it. Binod has taught himself to NOT feel. It was a skill he almost perfected in the rug factory where he worked 15-hour days tying knots.
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Sanju
Born to a destitute family, young Sanju was sent to work in a rug factory in Kathmandu. Like tens of thousands of other "carpet kids" throughout South Asia, Sanju was exploited for her tiny, nimble fingers that were considered ideal for the intricate motions required for weaving.
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Kumar
Kumar's future looked bright until he reached the fifth grade at his Sandu Dhunga village school in Nepal. His father, a construction worker, could no longer afford to support the family on his income so he borrowed money. When the family's loan payments substantially increased, his father pulled Kumar out of school to work and eventually sent him away with a carpet broker in order to pay off one of the loans.
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Anjana
The eldest of six children, Anjana has spent most of her childhood helplessly watching her abusive father push the family deeper and deeper into debt because of his heavy drinking. The young Anjana bravely tried to meet expectations thrust upon her to become the breadwinner of her family, but did so at great costs, emotionally and physically.
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Tanka
Tanka has had a rough life from the start. His mother died when he was just three-years-old, forcing him to live with his alcoholic and abusive father and step-mother. Unable to tolerate life in the violent household as he grew older, Tanka chose to go with a man to Kathmandu. He was sad that he had to leave school, but he never wanted to return to the life of constant abuse.
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Manju
Twelve year-old Manju grew up in Sajban, in one of Nepal's least developed districts. Although she was a very bright student, Manju's father took her out of school when she was in the sixth grade and sent her to work in a carpet factory. Manju was denied the right to go to school in order to help pay for her brother's private school education..
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Ramesh
Ramesh had to grow up quickly and at a young age. His father was an alcoholic with a history of unemployment; his eldest brother and sister moved to India from Nepal to try and earn money to help support the family.
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Yasmin
In late August 2012, the government of India was poised to ban all labor for children under age 14. Until now, laws have only protected children from hazardous work, such as mining. The new law, if passed and implemented, will enhance and support the work you’ve helped GoodWeave do in India to rescue and educate children at risk—children such as 14-year-old Yasmin, a daughter of carpet weavers who just gained access to schooling for the first time with help from GoodWeave.
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Sun Maya
Sun Maya grew up in a small trading town in Nepal’s Sindhupalchowk district. She often dreamed of visiting the capital city of Kathmandu, and in fourth grade, she got her chance. Her uncle offered to take her away to the city, lowering her family’s expenses. Sun Maya’s parents, poor farm hands, let her go.
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Gopal
Gopal grew up in a poor and violent home in Nepal’s central Makawanpur district, not far from Kathmandu. In a story we hear all too frequently, his father would spend all of his wages from farming on alcohol, return home drunk, and beat Gopal’s mother and often Gopal as well.
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Rabbani
After the death of his mother, 10-year-old Rabbani and his two siblings moved in with their grandmother in her two-room hut. One day, Rabbani’s neighbor offered him a job. Imagining a wealthy future beyond his village in Bihar, India’s poorest state, Rabbani agreed. His neighbor took him 370 miles west to a loom shed in Bhadohi, Uttar Pradesh, where he wove shag carpets for eight hours a day, earning seven cents an hour.
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Maya
Growing up in Ratanpur, Nepal, Maya watched as her father traded away her two older brothers. The boys were sent to work as servants to repay her father’s gambling losses. As the last child remaining, Maya dreaded she’d be next. And then she was.
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Gita
Gita was advancing steadily through her village’s tiny school with hopes of becoming a teacher when her father suddenly died. Her mother struggled to support the family of nine, but couldn’t earn enough. Gita was forced to drop out of sixth grade and move 50 miles west to Kathmandu. Gita would work for food and shelter in a carpet factory, her mother reasoned, and there would be one less mouth to feed.
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Saraswoti
Twenty-three-year-old Saraswoti’s determined look captures her desire to make a good life for herself and her family, despite all obstacles. Today she is coowner of the Sanctuary motorcycle repair and maintenance workshop—a remarkable achievement that might not have happened without critical and timely assistance from GoodWeave and other local organizations.
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Sanju Maya
Sanju Maya grew up with her parents and seven siblings never knowing a life without debt. Her father sent her to Kathmandu with a labor broker to weave rugs. She worked sixteen hour days, and when she was finished weaving, she had to cook and clean for the broker and his wife.
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