Child Labor Resources

Key Pages of Interest

 

Organizations Fighting Child Labor and Human Trafficking

GoodWeave is not fighting the battle against child labor and human trafficking alone. For information on the work of other organizations fighting child labor, please visit the sites of:

 

Documenting Child Labor

GoodWeave has partnered with a number of notable photographers, filmmakers, museum curators and other documentarians to generate greater awareness of the horrors of child labor. View the netherworld of child labor through the powerful lens of these documentarians at the following sites:

 

Teacher Resources

GoodWeave has created a one-page information sheet for use in educating elementary school children on the problem of child labor in the rug industry. In addition, GoodWeave encourages teachers to tap into resources at GoodWeave.org, in particular the children's stories, the children's slideshow, videos, and information on child labor.  These outside links are also recommended to help teachers develop lesson plans:

 

Kids Against Child Labor

Whether at home or in home room, kids are acting up and speaking out to end child labor. Click on the links below to read about youth working in their communities to combat the exploitation of their peers:


Get the flash player here: http://www.adobe.com/flashplayer

 

This list is by no means comprehensive. To suggest a link, please contact info@goodweave.org.

Children's Stories

At the age of five, Manju was already working on the rug looms. While she has since been found and freed from carpet work, some 250,000 children throughout South Asia still toil in obscurity. Through GoodWeave nearly 3,600 kids like Manju have been rescued, rehabilitated and educated, and thousands more deterred from entering the workforce.

More Stories »

Stand with Sanju

Stand with Sanju film still

About the Organization

GoodWeave works to end child labor in the carpet industry by certifying child-labor-free rugs and by providing education and opportunities to rescued and at-risk children. Learn More »